wordy

wordy, verbose, prolix, diffuse, redundant can all mean using or marked by the use of more words than are necessary to express the thought.
Wordy often carries no further implications, though it may suggest garrulousness or loquacity when the reference is to speech
{

went into considerable detail about the Fuehrer's thoughts and policies on almost every conceivable subject, being more wordy than any previous letter ... to his Italian partner— Shirer

}
{

a wordy, prolegomenous babbler— Stevenson

}
Verbose suggests overabundance of words as a literary fault characteristic especially of a writer or public speaker or of a work or speech; it often implies resulting dullness or obscurity of expression or a lack of incisiveness, confusion of ideas, or grandiloquence
{

a verbose style

}
{

a dull verbose narrative

}
{

his letters are full of interesting details but they are never verbose

}
Prolix implies such attention to minute details as to extend what is written or told beyond due bounds; the term carries a stronger implication of tediousness or wearisomeness than verbose
{

the belief, so prevalent abroad, that it is typical of Russian literature to be formless, prolix and hysterical— Edmund Wilson

}
{

this, then, was Nuflo's story, told not in Nuflo's manner, which was infinitely prolixHudson

}
Diffuse usually implies verbosity, but it throws the emphasis upon the lack of organization and of the compactness and condensation needed for pointedness and for strength of style; it often attributes flabbiness, looseness, or desultoriness to what is written
{

the one can be profuse on occasion; the other is diffuse whether he will or no— J. R. Lowell

}
{

though Seneca is long-winded, he is not diffuse; he is capable of great concision— T. S. Eliot

}
Redundant can apply to whatever is superfluous
{

older . . . occupations are becoming redundant and obsolete— Barkin

}
but in its specific application to words and phrases the term implies a superfluity that results from being repetitious or unneeded for clarity and accuracy of expression
{

revision of technical prose requires word by word review and elimination of whatever is redundant

}
In its corresponding application to writers, speakers, or utterances redundant implies the use of redundancies (see redundancy under VERBIAGE)
{

the naturally copious and flowing style of the author is generally redundantMackintosh

}
{

she had been, like nearly all very young writers, superfluous of phrase, redundantRose Macaulay

}
{

in sharp comment . . . quite demolished the emptiness and the pretentiousness of this redundant plan— Michener

}
Analogous words: *inflated, turgid, tumid, flatulent: bombastic, *rhetorical: loquacious, garrulous, voluble, glib, *talkative
Contrasted words: laconic, *concise, terse, succinct, summary, pithy, compendious

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Wordy — Word y, a. [Compar. {Wordier}; superl. {Wordiest}.] [1913 Webster] 1. Of or pertaining to words; consisting of words; verbal; as, a wordy war. Cowper. [1913 Webster] 2. Using many words; verbose; as, a wordy speaker. [1913 Webster] 3. Containing… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • wordy — [wʉr′dē] adj. wordier, wordiest 1. of words; verbal 2. containing or using many or too many words; verbose wordily adv. wordiness n. SYN. WORDY is the general word implying the use of more words in speaking or writing than are necessary for… …   English World dictionary

  • wordy — index flatulent, loquacious, profuse, prolific, prolix, redundant, turgid, voluble Burton s Legal Thesaurus …   Law dictionary

  • wordy — O.E. wordig verbose; see WORD (Cf. word) + Y (Cf. y) (2) …   Etymology dictionary

  • wordy — [adj] talkative bombastic, chatty*, diffuse, discursive, flatulent, gabby*, garrulous, inflated, lengthy, long winded, loquacious, palaverous, pleonastic, prolix, rambling, redundant, rhetorical, tedious, turgid, verbose, voluble, windy*; concept …   New thesaurus

  • wordy — ► ADJECTIVE (wordier, wordiest) ▪ using or expressed in too many words. DERIVATIVES wordily adverb wordiness noun …   English terms dictionary

  • wordy — wordily, adv. wordiness, n. /werr dee/, adj., wordier, wordiest. 1. characterized by or given to the use of many, or too many, words; verbose: She grew impatient at his wordy reply. 2. pertaining to or consisting of words; verbal. [bef. 1100; ME; …   Universalium

  • wordy — adjective (wordier; est) Date: 12th century 1. using or containing many and usually too many words 2. of or relating to words ; verbal • wordily adverb • wordiness noun Synonyms: wordy …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • wordy — [[t]wɜ͟ː(r)di[/t]] ADJ GRADED (disapproval) If you describe a person s speech or something that they write as wordy, you disapprove of the fact that they use too many words, especially words which are very long, formal, or literary. The chapter… …   English dictionary

  • wordy — un·wordy; wordy; …   English syllables

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.